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How The Dangers Of Natural Gas Production Affect You
March , 13 2009
7 pm - 9 am

Local citizens concerned about the consequences of proposed
widespread development of the natural gas industry in Otsego County will
present a series of forums open to the public in Cherry Valley, Cooperstown,
and Oneonta in mid-March
entitled: "How the Dangers of Gas Drilling Affect
You." The forums are sponsored by Sustainable Otsego.

Panelists will include Ron Bishop, Chemistry Lecturer at SUNY Oneonta, James
Herman, Hartwick property owner, and Colleen Blacklock, Oneonta resident who
has been researching gas drilling impacts on agriculture. They will address
concerns about water quality, public health, environmental degradation, and
damage to infrastructure raised by natural gas production and distribution,
including drilling, air pollution, pipelines, and toxic waste disposal.

The public will have three opportunities to attend:

The first event in the series will be in Cherry Valley on Friday, 13 March,
at 7 pm at the Cherry Valley Old School gym, two blocks west of the traffic
light in Cherry Valley on County Route 54.

The second event will be in Cooperstown, at 2 pm on Sunday, 15 March, at
Templeton Hall, 63 Pioneer Street.

The third event will be in Oneonta on Monday, 16th March at 7 pm at St.
Mary's Parish Center at the corner of Walnut and Elm Streets in Oneonta.

Dr. Bishop, who has conducted extensive research into the methods of natural
gas extraction, offers a sobering summary: "Energy industry leaders, state
regulators and our elected officials depict natural gas extraction in
Central New York as needed development at worst and a patriotic duty at
best. But Otsego County residents who are troubled by the likely impacts of
NYRI and wind turbines on our quality of life haven't seen anything yet: we
will be overwhelmed by the impacts of natural gas wells in our midst. In
spite of the smoke-and-mirrors routines of the "experts," we've put together
evidence that points to a future of polluted air and water, compacted and
contaminated soil, ruined roads and diminished health -- all for the
fleeting benefit of a few. Have we come so far to learn so little?"

Colleen Blacklock, a mother with young children, says "I am concerned for
the health and well being of the Oneonta community. Drilling sites with
their millions of gallons of highly toxic waste could be allowed to be
located near our reservoir and even near or in the rail-yard next to densely
populated neighborhoods. In Fort Worth Texas, citizens are now being overrun
with drill sites located downtown and in suburban neighborhoods."

James Herman of Hartwick has researched ongoing gas drilling
operations in other states. He is a product designer/graphic artist
who became concerned by the proliferation of gas leases in his
neighborhood; he underscores the greatest of the many threats it poses,
stating that "all of Otsego County's water ways and drinking water are
threatened by the onslaught of natural gas production."

"What we offer here is the testimony of a citizens' panel concerned with
community impacts," said Adrian Kuzminski, moderator of Sustainable Otsego,
"not industry consultants paid to advance someone's bottom line. Our
researchers make it plain that natural gas drilling and distribution as
proposed will have an unprecedented impact on our region. It poses serious
threats to our lakes, rivers, aquifers, public health, agriculture, air
quality, roads, landscapes, and property values. It will impose on our
communities a permanent industrial infrastructure which most people have not
even begun to imagine. Most of the benefits and profits will leave our
area. We should be looking instead to developing renewable local resources
under local control and preserving our rural way of life."

For more info contact: Adrian Kuzminski 607-547-8586; adrian@oecblue.com


How The Dangers Of Natural Gas Production Affect You
March , 13 2009
7 pm - 9 am

Local citizens concerned about the consequences of proposed
widespread development of the natural gas industry in Otsego County will
present a series of forums open to the public in Cherry Valley, Cooperstown,
and Oneonta in mid-March
entitled: "How the Dangers of Gas Drilling Affect
You." The forums are sponsored by Sustainable Otsego.

Panelists will include Ron Bishop, Chemistry Lecturer at SUNY Oneonta, James
Herman, Hartwick property owner, and Colleen Blacklock, Oneonta resident who
has been researching gas drilling impacts on agriculture. They will address
concerns about water quality, public health, environmental degradation, and
damage to infrastructure raised by natural gas production and distribution,
including drilling, air pollution, pipelines, and toxic waste disposal.

The public will have three opportunities to attend:

The first event in the series will be in Cherry Valley on Friday, 13 March,
at 7 pm at the Cherry Valley Old School gym, two blocks west of the traffic
light in Cherry Valley on County Route 54.

The second event will be in Cooperstown, at 2 pm on Sunday, 15 March, at
Templeton Hall, 63 Pioneer Street.

The third event will be in Oneonta on Monday, 16th March at 7 pm at St.
Mary's Parish Center at the corner of Walnut and Elm Streets in Oneonta.

Dr. Bishop, who has conducted extensive research into the methods of natural
gas extraction, offers a sobering summary: "Energy industry leaders, state
regulators and our elected officials depict natural gas extraction in
Central New York as needed development at worst and a patriotic duty at
best. But Otsego County residents who are troubled by the likely impacts of
NYRI and wind turbines on our quality of life haven't seen anything yet: we
will be overwhelmed by the impacts of natural gas wells in our midst. In
spite of the smoke-and-mirrors routines of the "experts," we've put together
evidence that points to a future of polluted air and water, compacted and
contaminated soil, ruined roads and diminished health -- all for the
fleeting benefit of a few. Have we come so far to learn so little?"

Colleen Blacklock, a mother with young children, says "I am concerned for
the health and well being of the Oneonta community. Drilling sites with
their millions of gallons of highly toxic waste could be allowed to be
located near our reservoir and even near or in the rail-yard next to densely
populated neighborhoods. In Fort Worth Texas, citizens are now being overrun
with drill sites located downtown and in suburban neighborhoods."

James Herman of Hartwick has researched ongoing gas drilling
operations in other states. He is a product designer/graphic artist
who became concerned by the proliferation of gas leases in his
neighborhood; he underscores the greatest of the many threats it poses,
stating that "all of Otsego County's water ways and drinking water are
threatened by the onslaught of natural gas production."

"What we offer here is the testimony of a citizens' panel concerned with
community impacts," said Adrian Kuzminski, moderator of Sustainable Otsego,
"not industry consultants paid to advance someone's bottom line. Our
researchers make it plain that natural gas drilling and distribution as
proposed will have an unprecedented impact on our region. It poses serious
threats to our lakes, rivers, aquifers, public health, agriculture, air
quality, roads, landscapes, and property values. It will impose on our
communities a permanent industrial infrastructure which most people have not
even begun to imagine. Most of the benefits and profits will leave our
area. We should be looking instead to developing renewable local resources
under local control and preserving our rural way of life."

For more info contact: Adrian Kuzminski 607-547-8586; adrian@oecblue.com


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